Wissam al-Saliby

July 4, 2013

The Outlook for the Church in Sudan

*By Wissam al-Saliby The North African region of Sudan—governed by British and Egyptian authorities until 1956—has long been a hotbed for Muslim-Christian tensions. Embroiled in a conflict that spans two civil wars, it is comprised of a predominately Muslim Arab North Sudan and a predominantly Christian South Sudan. On July […]
May 2, 2013

Should Christians Advocate for the Respect of International Humanitarian Law in the Syrian Conflict?

*By Wissam al-Saliby The cornerstone principle in International Humanitarian Law (IHL) is the principle of distinction: You can only attack military targets and persons directly participating in the war; you can never attack civilians. The violation of this principle, such as indiscriminate attacks, would amount to a war crime.[1] In […]
February 27, 2013

Advocating Migrant Domestic Workers Rights in Lebanon

By Wissam al-Saliby* In the spate of 12 days in October 2009, I read in the newspapers of the death – presumed suicide – of four migrant domestic workers. The workers were either Nepalese or Ethiopian. Ethiopian Suicides Upon the fourth death, I went online and opened a blog that […]