February 8, 2018

When the Lights go Down in the City: A Reflection on the Season’s Passing عندما تخفت الأضواء في المدينة فهذا انعكاس لانصرام موسم في حياتها

By Chaden Hani It was an abiding sense of desperation, frustration and repression which led Lebanese journalist and professor of history Samir Kassir to speak in 2004 of the “Arab malaise.” For as long as I can remember we have barely had a moment of our history lacking in conflict […]
January 18, 2018

Calling for Prophetic Passion الدعوة إلى شغف نبوي

By Robert Hamd Today, the younger generations of Christians are asking the difficult questions, such as why injustice persists. They are passionate about a convergence of the words of scripture and real-life practice. For example, they read passages from Isaiah that challenge us to “learn to do good; seek justice, […]
November 30, 2017

The Sufferari: Rethinking Humanitarian Tourism السفاري إلى أرض المعاناة: إعادة النظر في السياحة الإنسانية

By Brent Hamoud Landscapes throughout the MENA region have been transformed by unfolding crises of forced migration. This is especially the case in Lebanon. An estimated 1.5 million Syrian refugees reside within its borders adding layers of dimension to long-existing populations of displacement.[i] Many Syrian refugees reside in informal tented settlements. […]
November 23, 2017

Guns, Israel, Justice and the United Nations: How My Context Shapes My Writing الأسلحة، وإسرائيل، والعدالة، والأمم المتحدة: سياقي وأثره في كتابتي

By Wissam al-Saliby I am grateful for several recent conversations with American pastor friends, during which we spoke about writing from and on the Middle East, trans-Atlantic (mis)perceptions and political fault lines. One of these friends, who leans toward political conservativism, told me that when reading my posts on the […]
June 15, 2017

What the Poor Have Taught Me?

By Rupen Das* A 2009 study by Tomas Rees on the relationship between poverty and religiousness found that personal insecurity (due to stressful situations, such as poverty) was an important determinant of religiosity.[1] The poor tend to be more religious. I find the faith of the poor both intriguing and challenging. […]
April 13, 2017

Statelessness: Banned from Belonging

By Brent Hamoud Much has been made of US President Trump’s executive decisions temporarily banning select nationals and refugees from entering the USA. The order has been met with opposition in forums ranging from airport terminals to federal courts, which have so far blocked the executive decision from going into […]
March 23, 2017

Migrant Crises in Muslim and Christian Countries

According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), there are 63.91 million “persons of concern”, which includes refugees, people awaiting recognition as refugees, and people who have fled their homes but not sought refuge in another country. Of these, 16.1 million are refugees, that is people who fled […]
March 16, 2017

Re-Reading Our Times

The 1970s were defining for me. Those were my high school years. Growing up between Lebanon and the US gave me the opportunity to experience those formative high school years cross-culturally. I was a mid-western boy living in a Middle Eastern home. Recently, I’ve decided to reread some of my […]